(800) 228-6724

News

A VISION and A SACRED TRUST

Warm Beach Camp FoundersFrom left to right: Charles Kirkpatrick, Stanley Watkins, Forest Bush Sr., S.E. FosketIn the mid 1950’s, a group of people launched an incredible vision to build Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center. The leaders of the Washington Conference of the Free Methodist denomination came together to sell two small camps that were going to be overtaken by the construction of I-5.

The vision they pursued was multiple times the scope of what was being given up. Two small properties for a big spacious property overlooking Port Susan Bay. They went from a vision of serving hundreds to envisioning ministry to tens of thousands every year.

The photo is an iconic picture of four great men who gave leadership to the vision. As a boy and young man, I had the privilege of knowing each of these great men. There were many others that were working right alongside them.

Earlier this year, the last of these four men, Forest Bush, went home to be with Jesus. At a recent Warm Beach Camp Board of Directors meeting, we took time to remember what they, in faith and obedience to God, had begun. 

As a Board, we were overwhelmed with two clear thoughts:

  1. WHAT A VISION - The vision of Warm Beach Camp begun all those years ago has grown to over 92,000 people in 2015.
  2. WHAT A SACRED TRUST - We have a sacred trust to continue this vision in the same faith and obedience to God in changing times. 

Dear Father,

Thank You for the founders of Warm Beach Camp. Thank You for the vision You gave to them. Thank You for their faith and obedience. Thank You for all the lives being changed every year through Your gospel and creation. 

Guide us in continuing this sacred trust. Guide us in keeping the path clear to the cross of Jesus Christ.  Guide us to develop the ministry for current and future generations. 

Thank You.

In Jesus' name,
Amen 

Ed McDowell, Executive Director
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

Project Updates - July 2016

Here is the latest news on the Camp’s current projects:

  • Chapel Project Update716Work continues on the refurbishment project in Cedar Lodge Chapel. New windows and exterior doors have been installed, and the interior walls have been refinished. The last two family restrooms are now finished. Work still in progress includes the new audio/visual systems, new chairs, a snack counter, and possibly lighting and ceiling paint. This is the final project of the Embracing the Vision Campaign that provided funding for the new restrooms on the main floor of Cedar Lodge, and the remodel work in the kitchen and north end of the basement. We are grateful for the many people who gave through the Campaign to make this all possible.

  • New carpet has been installed in Cascadian Lobby and the hallways. You will have to take a peek next time you are on the grounds! Fundraising through a room memorialization program has begun that will allow us to refurbish the sleeping rooms in this lodge as well.

  • Volunteers have finished the painting project at the Stables. Over the last two years, all of the buildings at the Stables, along with Bayview Ranch House, have been repainted. They look really nice with their fresh new paint. Thank you, volunteers!

  • The new wider sidewalk is in that goes from the Senior Community to Maple Center. This project replaced the old four-foot sidewalk with a new ten-foot-wide one, improving safety and accommodating more pedestrian traffic.

  • The new outdoor sound system in the Amphitheater has been installed and is now fully operational. This is a huge improvement, allowing a greater range of programming to occur outside, year-round. Funding for this project came from two long-time guest groups, individuals, and Warm Beach Camp.

  • A new pedestrian entry for The Lights of Christmas near the front entrance is complete. This will direct the people parking across Marine Drive into the RV area where they will have a safer, more direct route to the ticket gates than has been possible in the past.

  • New storage shed and corrals at the Stables are being installed. This allows for improved vaulting tack storage and improvements to winter horse feeding.

If you are interested in volunteering to help with any projects, whether you have a few hours or a few days, call Jessica Wilson at (360) 312-3417 or you can contact her by email.

Add a comment

Kids 2 Camp Benefit Auction is fun for everyone!

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Silent Auction450The seventeenth annual Kids 2 Camp Benefit Auction is just a few weeks away! This fun and important event raises funds for the Kids 2 Camp Scholarship Fund, helping make it possible for kids to go to camp. Last year, the auction raised more than $111,000!

This year, you will find some incredible items in the auctions, including lots of great gift items, some real “finds,” and even some nice get-away experiences. There’s something for everyone in every price range!

The auction preview opens at 10:00 a.m., and the first auction begins at 10:45 a.m. The auctions run until approximately 3:00 p.m. The two live auctions and a silent auction will feature hundreds of items, including things for the yard and garden, dining opportunities, gift certificates, craft items, tools, gift items for kids, vacation packages, sports memorabilia, home furnishings, and one-of-a-kind experiences. The event also has activities for the kids and food concessions on site, this year featuring a lunch buffet with choice of entrée, soups, salads, and delicious dessert.

This is the largest fundraiser we hold each year for the Kids 2 Camp Fund, and is important in providing the needed funding that allows any child who wants to come to camp the means to attend. Besides, it is just plain fun for everyone! Mark your calendar for Saturday, August 27, and plan on being there.

For more information, or to see a list of the auction items, go to the Kids 2 Camp Benefit Auction webpage.

Add a comment

A wonderful problem to have!

Volunteerism has been an important part of Warm Beach Camp since its inception. In the early years, there was only one paid staff couple. The kitchen, program and hospitality staff were comprised solely of volunteers. Many of the original buildings were constructed using mostly volunteer labor.

VolVillageEdit

As WBC has grown, so has its volunteer family. There has been a slow but steady increase in participation from 30,150 hours in 2008 to 50,916 hours in 2015. Today’s volunteers participate in nearly every area of ministry just like their predecessors did in 1959.

A major portion of the Camp’s current volunteer base is made up of RV Volunteers who live and travel in RV’s. They stay and volunteer at WBC for anywhere from one month to several years, providing stability and consistency in many of our programs and projects. This added workforce accomplishes work that would not get done otherwise.

The Camp currently has 20 RV sites dedicated to RV Volunteers. In our peak seasons, summer and The Lights of Christmas, often every site is filled. This summer, for the first time, WBC has had to turn away volunteer help for lack of space. Additional long term Volunteer RV sites are needed in order to accommodate the numbers of volunteers that want to stay and serve for an extended period of time.

The Camp is looking to develop five additional long term RV sites and improve three to five existing sites at a total cost of $30,000. Each site will produce an additional 500-2,000 volunteer hours per year depending on the length of stay of the volunteers, providing a significant return on investment for years to come.

We praise the Lord for drawing volunteers to the ministry of Warm Beach Camp and trust that He will continue to give us the means to provide for them.

Add a comment

The first ever Kids 2 Camp Benefit Run

August 27, 2016

K2C Fun Run 1Warm Beach Camp helped more than 1,600 campers attend camp last year who would otherwise have been left out. This is possible only because of the generous financial help from many people. This year, the Camp is offering a new way to come alongside and help raise funds for Kids 2 Camp. It is the Kids 2 Camp Benefit Run scheduled for August 27 at WBC.

The Benefit Run Schedule:

7:00 am - Packet pick-up
7:30 am - Late registration
8:00 am - 10k race starts
8:15 am - 5k race starts
9:30 am - 1 mile race starts
11:00 am - Lunch available for purchase

Camp is a place where kids can leave behind the cares, distractions, and problems of everyday life. It’s an opportunity for them to experience a breather — to catch a vision for the bigger picture of their lives where the love of God can become more real.

Join us for a fun run to benefit the Kids 2 Camp Scholarship fund at Warm Beach Camp. For more information, please visit the Benefit Run website, or call the Camp at 1-800-228-6724.

Add a comment

This feels like coming home...

A young couple got out of their car, just arriving for camp, and walked up the sidewalk to Cedar Lodge. He turned to her and said, “I feel like I am coming home.”

There is a desire in all of us to feel like we are coming home. The descriptions of “home” may vary from person to person. Unconditional love, acceptance, certain types of food, relationships, traditions, a place and space that feeds the soul, are all parts that make up this ideal of “home.”

Bev, my wife, often asks me this question: “Does it feed your soul?” What a great question when we think about home and all that it means. My favorite place at home is the fire circle. Recently, I went to the fire circle by myself and built a fire, and people started to gather. We laughed, talked, prayed, and even spent time just staring into the beauty and warmth of the fire. I was home. My soul was being fed.

The truth is, this desire to come home is from God. He is with us on a journey that brings us home to be with Him forever. Being with Him is the ultimate place of unconditional love, acceptance, feasts, relationships, and traditions that will last forever. With Him, we know that our soul is fed.

At camp, coming home might be connection with friends, cinnamon rolls, riding a horse, or paddling a canoe. It might be a favorite space or the sunsets. Whatever it means to you to come home to camp, please know that it is evidence of a deeper reality: God, through His Son Jesus Christ, invites us to live with Him forever. 

Coming Home…

Ed McDowell, Executive Director
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

Sign of an open heart…

Sometimes people get hit so hard in life that their heart and emotions simply close up and become hard, defensive and protective of self at almost any cost. If you are in this situation, or helping someone in this situation, there are two things to know:

  1. Just one meaningful connection: It only takes one meaningful connection between a person with a closed heart and someone or something else to begin to open up the heart again. ONLY ONE. The connection can be with a horse, a dog, or a coach, friend or relative.  
    I have watched God increasingly use horses at Warm Beach Camp to provide the one meaningful connection needed to open up a hard, scared and broken heart.
  2. Gratitude is the evidence of a closed heart opening up: When you start to hear someone express gratitude for one meaningful connection, be encouraged, because the heart and emotions are risking opening up to the possibilities of giving and receiving love again.

Caution for parents: Parents want to be the meaningful connection with a child who is hurt. However, the meaningful connection may need to be a horse instead. Don’t assume that you are the answer. Be open to who or what God would bring into your child’s life to open up their heart and spirit. Supportively be faithful to the part God has given you as the parent.

Opportunity for all: Shared experiences encourage connection. Consider Warm Beach Camp as a great place to connect and encourage people whose hearts are closed and hard. Pray they will find one connection, open up and receive love, and begin to express gratitude.

Ed McDowell, Executive Director
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

From Florida with Love

Much of the work of ministry at Warm Beach Camp Lakeland 2016consists of preparing the way for others to experience rest, renewal, and re-connection. With good preparation, guests are able to fully enter into the purposes for which they come. Scripture exhorts us to bear one another’s burdens and thus live out the love taught by Jesus. We do this for each group that comes on the grounds as we prepare clean facilities, good food, and fun activities.

Recently, the Lakeland Christian School senior class came all the way from Lakeland, Florida, to bear our burdens for two days. They helped us accomplish so much more than we could have done otherwise.

The enthusiasm and work ethic of the Lakeland students and staff was a true blessing. This year, the biggest project area was a heroic effort to remove ivy from the entrance berm. They removed 3,000 lbs. of ivy! This work makes possible the eventual replanting with native understory which will provide better habitat and visual screening thus enhancing first impressions as guests come on to the property.

In addition to massive ivy removal, the Lakeland group constructed ten new picnic tables, organized and cleaned the RV campgrounds, built a new fence in front of a staff house, deep cleaned an amazing amount of facilities, prepared Chinook Village for a summer of Special Friends ministry, painted facilities at the Horse Stables, erected tents for summer programs, and restored much needed landscaping areas to spaces of beauty and refreshment.

On top of this, they left a financial gift, which is going toward the eventual interior refurbishment of Cascadian Lodge sleeping rooms. Their sacrificial giving and servant’s hearts are a testimony of the effective discipleship that students receive at Lakeland Christian School. God is bringing his Kingdom to life through this school.

Warm Beach Camp’s ministry will be a blessing to the people of the Pacific Northwest in part because a group of students came all the way from Florida to be a blessing to Warm Beach Camp. And we pray the blessing of love and service extended to us will return to them many times over.

Patrick Patterson, General Manager/C.O.O.
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

Come together...

As a parent, we never know when the meaningful moment is going to come with our kids. These moments we treasure, where all of the sudden we are in the middle of something special, memorable, humorous or tender. The beautiful part is that we are in it together, with our kids.

We can’t plan them, or create them on demand. What we can do is spend time together. One thing is true, these moments are only experienced when we are hanging out with our kids.

One great way to share those moments is a family experience at Warm Beach Camp. When is the last time you and your kids met the challenge together of the human whirlpool at the swimming pool?  Have you celebrated someone getting to the top of a 40-foot climbing wall or marveled at the natural beauty of Port Susan Bay as your canoe slides through the water with each stroke of the oar?  

Don’t you long to share some stories around the camp fire or ride bikes on the miles of trails?  

It is in the middle of this kind of time spent together that the meaningful moments happen. It might be a conversation about faith, or something very funny that will be a source of laughter and joy for years to come.

Come together, come to Warm Beach Camp, life changes here.

Ed McDowell, Executive Director
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

Dads, create a "win" with your kids

Dad and Me Weekend IMG_3608_web300.jpgOne of the great wins Warm Beach Camp has given to me as a Dad are the Dad & Me Weekends. These weekends are all about a great time with my sons and daughters with all of the fun and ease of great camp experiences...

On Friday after a good dinner, enjoy a night swim. Meet the challenge of the human whirlpool. If you have some energy left, take each other on in mini golf under the stars. Or, enjoy an exciting game of laser tag.

Saturday begins with homemade cinnamon rolls. Can you smell them? They taste awesome. Combine them with a cup of hot chocolate or fresh coffee in front of the roaring fire by the big stone fire place. Wow!  

Enjoy morning devotions as a group, and then it is off to many adventures that may include canoes, mountain boards, climbing walls, biking, hiking, zip lines, high ropes, archery, bb guns, disc golf, more swimming, and rocket building. Maybe even a chance to catch a nap laying out on a sun soaked grassy hillside overlooking horses in the pastures below.

Saturday evening is a traditional camp fire, complete with s’mores and camp fire stories of the day’s adventures.   

Sunday morning is a pancake breakfast hot off the grill. This transitions into group devotions where dads and kids are given practical tips on how to follow God in their relationships with each other. The weekend culminates with the Dad & Me rocket launch combined with burgers on the grill. 

My kids are all getting older, ranging from 17-31 years old. When stories are told at our house, the Dad & Me Weekends are something that stand out in their lives as one of the traditions they value.  

Dads, do you need a “win” with your kids? Come to a Dad & Me Weekend this year.  

2016 dates are:  
Dad and Sons:  June 3-5 and September 9-11
Dad and Daughters:  June 10-12 and September 16-18

More information and to register: http://www.warmbeach.com/programs/family-programs/dad-and-me-weekends

Ed McDowell, Executive Director
Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center

Add a comment

Meet Warm Beach Camp’s new Horsemanship Director – Part 2

150 Lisa Tremain crop2Lisa shares more about her life in New Zealand and her heart’s desire to impact lives through a horsemanship experience.

Q:  What were some of your influences growing up?

A: My parent’s worked at camps while I was growing up. Having so many fun activities, like horses, right in your backyard is so cool. We moved around a lot so I got to experience a number of different camps. It is interesting to see how different camps operate and how many incredible ways there are to reach people with the love of God. I think growing up in the camping environment definitely influenced my love for horses, nature and people.

Q: Do you have siblings?

A: I have one brother and one sister. They are both married. My brother has two kids and one on the way. My sister just had a little girl. They live in New Zealand. All of my immediate family lives in New Zealand.

Q: How did you become a Christian?

A: I grew up in a Christian family. We went to church regularly and my parents worked in Christian camping, so I was pretty well surrounded and heard about God from a very young age. When I was about nine I was at a camp and decided to make that my personal faith too. I would have claimed I was a Christian prior to that but that’s when I remember clearly making a decision that wasn’t just my parent’s faith, it’s my faith – I do believe in God and I love Him and know He loves me.

Q: After you were an intern at Warm Beach Camp, what did you do?

A: I ended up getting married to an American. My husband, Tyler, grew up coming to Warm Beach Camp and was really involved here. Right after we were married, we went to New Zealand and worked at a horse program for three months but had to come back because Tyler had difficulty getting a visa. Tyler worked at a church in youth and young adult ministry. It wasn’t possible for both of us to be doing ministry - someone needed to work to pay the bills - so, I worked in the “business world” doing accounting, purchasing and general business administration. Which I also love – I have a passion for paperwork. While I did that, I helped Tyler in the ministries he was running.

Q: How did you get back to New Zealand?

A: We really both missed working in ministry together. I grew up in camping ministry, and to me that is the ultimate lifestyle – I think it’s a great way to show and teach people about God and also have a loving community. Tyler loves camping too. At the time when we looked into getting back into camping ministry it was the recession here so camps weren’t hiring, but in New Zealand they were. It’s always nice to see how God leads and you know it’s the right thing to do. One day I sat down and wrote a list of all the obstacles that were preventing us from going – there were probably 10 different things in the way. When we pursued going back to New Zealand we were just planning a three week trip but then all the things on the list kept getting crossed off. Within a month, every single one of the things that had been on the list for years suddenly weren’t a problem anymore. So, God opened up the doors for us to move back there.

Q: What did you do when you returned to New Zealand?

A:  We worked at the horse camp where we were when we first got married. After a year and a half we moved to another camp where my husband was the Kids’ Camp Director and I helped him with the administration for the camps. Even though I loved it and it was great, I did miss the horse aspect and how much you can use horses to teach simple analogies about God - our relationship with the horse and rider and how that compares to our relationship with God. I did really miss that.

Q: When you came to America, were there things we said you didn’t understand?

A: Even though we both speak English, we say different things. I think it’s easier for New Zealander’s coming to America because we see all the American movies, so when we come here it’s not so foreign. I think people from America who go to New Zealand have a harder time understanding what different things mean. Funny things like the words and phrasings, not even the accent. If you say “this is a cruisey horse” it means they are really laid back and easy going.  I often say “don’t run around the horses as you’ll give them a fright”, meaning you will startle them.  

Q: What are some similarities and differences between New Zealand and here?

A: The Pacific Northwest is very similar to New Zealand, I think that’s why it has been easier for me and why I feel so at home here. The rain is definitely a similarity. Winter is wet in New Zealand, so that’s an easy adjustment to make. It’s beautiful and green most of the time. When I’m in America I miss the beaches – New Zealand has incredible beaches. Here you can drive six hours and get to a nice beach but even then it’s super windy and you have to wear a jacket – that’s just not my idea of being at a beach. You’re supposed to lay on a beach in the sun to get a tan, not a layer of sand! In the part of New Zealand where I grew up, there aren’t mountains like here. I love seeing the snow on the mountains. I never had snow where I lived in New Zealand. It was a cool experience for me the first time it snowed when I was here. It was like a dream come true.

Q: What do you like to do on your days off?

A: The funny thing is, I find myself wanting to go down to the barn on my days off, which is ridiculous considering I’m probably there more hours than I should be. But it’s hard because jumping into the role of Horsemanship Director keeps me busy doing chores and other tasks that even though I’m surrounded by horses all day, I don’t usually have much time to actually ride them. So sometimes on my days off I just want to go and ride to have fun. Other than horses, I really like to play board games - I’m very competitive! I also enjoy being out in nature seeing God’s beautiful creation. At the moment on our days off, we are mostly catching up with our friends and family we haven’t seen for a number of years, hanging out and talking a lot. I love coffee so I love being back where there is drive-thru coffee every block!  I also enjoy crafts and other things, but I don’t have much time for those at the moment.

Q: Looking into the future for the Horsemanship program, are there things you would like to see happen?

A: We currently have western riding and vaulting, so I would like to see some English brought in to give kids a well-rounded experience of horses and the different things you can do with them. At the moment we have our summer programs and Saturday riding lessons and we will continue to do those and grow those programs. Also, I would like to explore other ways we can use horses all year round. I’m interested in how we can use horses to help kids that are in a difficult place in life. I recently visited Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch in Oregon – they work with rescued horses and at risk youth. I looked at their program for ways we may do something similar, working with kids and helping them in their life. I would like to see ways we can reach out to more kids in our community. I’m excited by the possibilities.

Q: Is there anything else you would like people to know about the impact horsemanship can have for kids?

A: A lot of people see horses as a luxury item, like it’s a fun thing to do. But it can be much more. There is so much we can teach through horses that kids often can’t learn in a classroom. Sometimes in a classroom kids shut down but when they are out on a horse you have the opportunity to input into their lives and help them overcome the struggles they are facing or help them through it. Even just brushing the horse can be soothing or relaxing, or giving them a hug and feeling its breath on their hand can take them to a different place and give them hope. I would like to find ways we can actually help change lives through it.

Add a comment
Blog RSS FeedSubscribe to our Blog RSS feed
Powered by mod LCA